In Tanya Golash-Boza’s article entitled “Dropping the Hyphen?  Becoming Latino/a-American through Racialized Assimilation”, Boza states:

In contemporary U.S. society, we learn our racial place through interactions with others.  If others classify us as white, we learn to expect preferential treatment.  If others classify us as something other than white we learn to expect marginalization.  This marginalization plays out in different ways, depending on a wide variety of factors, including, but not limited to, skin color, manner of speaking, body language, hair texture and facial features. (Boza 33)

Boza states the “we learn our racial place through interactions with others”.  This happens if you’re white, black, Latino, Asian, and so on.  Race places everyone in categories and even a child regardless of race understands their place in society.  Even if they are not consciously aware of it, society depicts a hierarchy with whiteness and children grasp this at an early age.  She also states that Latinos “learn to expect preferential treatment” if others classify them as white, and they expect “marginalization” if they classify them as black or other.  She also states that depending on “skin color, manner of speaking, body language, hair texture and facial features”, the marginalization plays out in different ways.  Boza implies that the darker their skin, the more “ethnic” they speak and “act”, the coarser their hair and the larger their features the more they are racialized or discriminated against.

 

 



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